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News Feed of the ten most recent book-related news stories from Bookbrowse.
Updated: 14 min 47 sec ago

George Saunders Wins the Man Booker Prize for 'Lincoln in the Bardo'

Tue, 10/17/2017 - 16:37
George Saunders's first novel, Lincoln in the Bardo, has won the Man Booker Prize. Originally, the award was restricted to novels written by authors from Britain, Ireland and the Commonwealth nations, but in 2014, it was opened to any novel written in English and published in Britain. This is now the second year that the prize has been won by an American author - last year's winner was Paul Beatty for The Sellout.

Bookstore sales down 11% in August compared to last year

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 15:31
Bookstore sales in the USA fell 10.9%, to $1.4 billion, compared to August 2016, according to preliminary estimates from the Census Bureau. For the first eight months of the year, bookstore sales are down 2.6%. Total retail sales for the year to date have risen 3.8%.

Harry Potter exhibition sells record 30,000 advance tickets

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 11:58
The British Library has revealed that its Harry Potter exhibition has sold more than 30,000 tickets - the highest number of advance tickets it has ever sold for an exhibition.

Richard Wilbur, Poet Laureate and Pulitzer winner, dies at 96

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 11:35
Richard Wilbur, whose meticulous, urbane poems earned him two Pulitzer Prizes and selection as the national poet laureate, died on Saturday in Belmont, Mass. He was 96.

Tom Hanks on Weinstein, Trump, history, and his just published book

Thu, 10/12/2017 - 13:55
In an extensive interview with Maureen Dowd, Tom Hanks talks about many topics including his just published short story collection, Uncommon Type.

Publishing tastemakers bet on readers wanting escapism and connection #books #news

Thu, 10/12/2017 - 13:46
Escapism and connection–this is what buyers at the Frankfurt Book Fair are betting readers want. Descending on Germany against the backdrop of a tumultuous and disheartening news cycle, the tastemakers in the publishing industry spent big on a handful of women's fiction titles, and a bunch of memoirs. While the novels will offer a classic dose of escapism, the memoirs, some insiders mused, can deliver something readers may crave even more in these divisive times: a sense of connection with other people.

Follett Settles Counterfeiting Suit with Publishers

Wed, 10/11/2017 - 13:06
A little over three months after it was sued by three major educational publishers charging it with selling counterfeit textbooks, Follett Corp. has agreed to adopt the anti-counterfeiting best practices program developed by a new publishers' group. In exchange for adopting the program, the lawsuit has been dismissed.

Viet Thanh Nguyen and Jesmyn Ward named MacArthur Fellows

Wed, 10/11/2017 - 05:00
Among the just announced 24 MacArthur Fellows are novelist and critic Viet Thanh Nguyen, and novelist and memoirist Jesmyn Ward. Playwright Annie Baker, who won the Pulitzer in 2014 for The Flick; New York Times Magazine reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones (her first book, The Problem We All Live With, is due to publish in 2019); and artist and geographer Trevor Paglen (who has also published a number of books) are also among the 24 2017 Fellows.

The fellowship, which honors "exceptionally creative people," comes with a no-strings-attached grant of $625,000, to be awarded over five years. It is known colloquially as the "genius" award, to the sometime annoyance of the foundation.

The convoluted world of best-seller lists, explained

Mon, 10/09/2017 - 13:04
Vox explores the mysteries of how books get on to bestseller lists, how the many different lists are formulated, and how the system was gamed by author Lani Sarem for her novel, Handbook for Mortals which rocketed to first place on the NY Times's young adult hardcover best-seller list in late August.

23 movies based on books releasing soon, and a further 45+ in development

Fri, 10/06/2017 - 04:01
BookBrowse's annual roundup of movies based on books is possibly the most comprehensive list of its kind. This year's report covers 23 films releasing soon, and a further 45+ in development.

Kazuo Ishiguro talks to the BBC about his first response to winning the Nobel Prize for Literature

Thu, 10/05/2017 - 05:00
British writer Kazuo Ishiguro has won the 2017 Nobel Prize for Literature.

The novelist was praised by the Swedish Academy as a writer "who, in novels of great emotional force, has uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world".

The 62-year-old writer said the award was "flabbergastingly flattering".

Cynan Jones wins BBC National Short Story Award

Wed, 10/04/2017 - 11:55
Welsh writer Cynan Jones has won the £15,000 BBC National Short Story Award with BookTrust for his "tenderly devastating exploration of the body".

The novelist and scriptwriter beat four other nominated writers including three of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists with his story, 'The Edge of the Shoal, described as one of the judges, Eimear McBride, as as "perfect a short story as I've ever read". McBride also revealed she had thought about it "most days" since reading it months ago.

European Union hits Amazon with "huge bill over back taxes"

Wed, 10/04/2017 - 05:00
Amazon must pay €250m in back taxes after the European Commission judged the company had enjoyed tax benefits in Luxembourg which were illegal under EU state aid rules.

The EC member in charge of competition, Margarethe Vestager, said in a press conference this morning that Amazon's tax benefits in Luxembourg had reduced its tax bill over eight years from May 2006 to June 2014. Amazon must now repay that tax benefit, €250m plus interest, within four months.

The Big Titles U.S. Agencies Will be Selling at the Frankfurt Book Fair

Sun, 10/01/2017 - 17:30
Publishers Weekly looks at the big titles that American agents will be talking up in the rights center at the upcoming Frankfurt Book Fair including the debut novel from Sopranos' actor Michael Imperioli, a memoir by filmaker David Lynch, an update on Cinderella, and a short story collection from Lionel Shriver.

The Fair is the world's largest trade fair for books, based both on the number of publishing companies represented, and the number of visitors. It will take place Oct 11-15

'In 2017, censorship comes from an outraged public'

Sun, 10/01/2017 - 17:22
The Guardian looks at the worrying trend of popular pressure forcing children's books off shelves, particularly in the USA.

"In 2017, we can read what we like but there is a different kind of censorship in operation, not coming from the state but from an outraged public. We really need to be aware and wary of it and we're not, sufficiently."

Dan Brown talks about his new book, <i>Origin</i>, and takes readers on a tour of his house

Sun, 10/01/2017 - 05:00
Dan Brown takes Sarah Lyall on a tour of his house and talks about his eighth book (and fifth starring Robert Langdon), Origin, publishing Oct 3; and in particular why he includes chunks of expository information into the narrative of all his books. In the case of Origin these include the wide-ranging talents of Winston Churchill, the elusive appeal of abstract art, the exciting peculiarities of Gaudi's Sagrada Familia cathedral and the latest insane developments in the world of artificial intelligence.

Speaking of his novels in general Brown says, "I feel like if I'm going to take time reading, I better be learning...This is the kind of fiction I would read if I read fiction."

Why UK and US book jackets are often so different?

Sun, 10/01/2017 - 05:00
The Guardian looks at the question that puzzles many readers: Why are books published with different covers in different countries, even those that share the same language such as the UK and USA?

According to jacket designer, Stuart Bache: "The gulf between British and US design has narrowed in recent years, especially in literary fiction. Traditionally, US design tended towards literal interpretation, driven, Bache believes, by the complexity of the US market: the image that motivates readers in southern California to pick up a copy of a book is likely to be different to what appeals to readers in South Carolina. As a result, US jackets have tended to appeal to the lowest common denominator, and that does not make for good design."

"It's a complicated [market], so the design becomes simpler and focuses on broader appeal. However, things have shifted in the last few years. There are a lot more similarities now, particularly in literary novels where the luxury of creating much more elegant, beautiful covers has been afforded to the books."

Designer and illustrator Neil Gower believes US designers have upped their game because of the explosion in digital books. "I think ebooks and the internet have definitely focused publishers' attention on making books beautiful, covetable objects again. Publishers on both sides of the Atlantic realise that to justify the cost of a hardback, a book needs to be more than a container of words. It has to be an object of beauty in its own right, he says."

Librarian rejects Melania Trump's book donation

Fri, 09/29/2017 - 05:00
A school librarian has declared that she would not like a selection of Dr Seuss classics here, there or anywhere, after refusing books donated by Melania Trump.

Trump had sent a collection of 10 Seuss books, including The Cat in the Hat and Green Eggs and Ham, to schools across the country to mark National Read a Book Day. One school in each state, identified by the US department of education as having achieved high standards of excellence, received a package along with a letter signed by the first lady telling pupils that "the key to achieving your dreams begins with learning to read".

But Liz Phipps Soeiro, an award-winning school librarian at Cambridgeport elementary school in Massachusetts, turned down the offer, saying that her school has no need for the books. In a letter posted on the Horn Book site, she suggested that Trump should send the books to schools with fewer resources.

"Why not go out of your way to gift books to underfunded and underprivileged communities that continue to be marginalised and maligned by policies put in place by Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos?" Phipps Soeiro asked. "Why not reflect on those 'high standards of excellence' beyond only what the numbers suggest? Secretary DeVos would do well to scaffold and lift schools instead of punishing them with closures and slashed budgets."

Kit Reed (1932-2017)

Wed, 09/27/2017 - 10:51
Kit Reed, "a prolific author with an astonishing range who published work consistently for almost 60 years, writing outstanding novels and stories in various genres for children, teens and adults," died September 24 aged 85.

New research suggests that splitting an infinitive should no longer be considered a grammar error

Mon, 09/25/2017 - 05:00
Splitting an infinitive and starting a sentence with "so" or "like" are all habits that any self-respecting grammar pedant would abhor.

But a new study has found that conventions which prohibit such practises are so widely flouted, they have effectively become part of modern spoken English.

Researchers have suggested that teachers no longer need to advise pupils against splitting infinitives (a rule introduced in the Victorian era) or starting sentences with "so" or "like", since they are now in common parlance.

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